Loving someone who is loving me


Sometimes we look to far way for someone to look up to. Sometimes we are so inferior of what we are that we try to copy others. Sometimes we are just too stupid to see that someone that we love right now doesn’t love us back (so why waste our time to love but not loved? love someone who you know loves you, and wish for good things to happen to you) Copied from a blog (No, copy and paste is not my usual way of blogging, but this touched my heart so deep I need to share it)

If a man like Muhamed were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world, he would succeed in solving its problems that would bring it the much needed peace and happiness.

George Bernard Shaw

People like Pasteur and Salk are leaders in the first sense. People like Gandhi and Confucius, on one hand, and Alexander, Caesar and Hitler on the other, are leaders in the second and perhaps the third sense. Jesus and Buddha belong in the third category alone. Perhaps the greatest leader of all times was Mohammed, who combined all three functions. To a lesser degree, Moses did the same.

Professor Jules Masserman

Head of the State as well as the Church, he was Caesar and Pope in one; but, he was Pope without the Pope’s pretensions, and Caesar without the legions of Caesar, without a standing army, without a bodyguard, without a police force, without a fixed revenue. If ever a man had the right to say that he ruled by a right divine, it was Muhummed, for he had all the powers without their supports. He cared not for the dressings of power. The simplicity of his private life was in keeping with his public life.

Rev. R. Bosworth-Smith

Muhammad was the soul of kindness, and his influence was felt and never forgotten by those around him.

Diwan Chand Sharma, The Prophets of the East, Calcutta 1935, p. l 22.

Four years after the death of Justinian, A.D. 569, was born at Mecca, in Arabia the man who, of all men exercised the greatest influence upon the human race . . . Mohammed . . .

John William Draper, M.D., L.L.D.,
A History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, London 1875, Vol. 1, pp. 329-330

In little more than a year he was actually the spiritual, nominal and temporal rule of Medina, with his hands on the lever that was to shake the world.

John Austin,
“Muhammad the Prophet of Allah,” in T.P. ‘s and Cassel’s Weekly for 24th September 1927.

Philosopher, Orator, Apostle, Legislator, Warrior, Conqueror of ideas Restorer of rational beliefs, of a cult without images; the founder of twenty terrestrial empires and of one spiritual empire, that is Muhammed. As regards all standards by which human greatness may be measured, we may well ask, is there any man greater than he?

Lamartine,
Historie de la Turquie, Paris 1854, Vol. 11 pp. 276-2727

It is impossible for anyone who studies the life and character of the great prophet of Arabia, who knows how he taught and how he lived, to feel anything but reverence for that mighty Prophet, one of the great messengers of the Supreme. And although in what I put to you I shall say many things which may be familiar to many, yet I myself feel whenever I re-read them, a new way of admiration, a new of reverence for that mighty Arabian teacher.

Annie Besant,
The Life and Teachings of Muhammad, Madras 1932, p. 4

Muhummed is the most successful of all Prophets and religious personalities.

Encyclopedia Britannica

I have studied him – the wonderful man – and in my opinion far from being an anti-Christ he must be called the saviour of humanity.

George Bernard Shaw in “The Genuine Islam

By a fortune absolutely unique in history, Mohammed is a threefold founder of a nation, of an empire, and of a religion.

Rev. R. Bosworth-Smith in “Mohammed and Mohammedanism 1946.

“It is not the propagation but the permanency of his religion that deserves our wonder, the same pure and perfect impression which he engraved at Mecca and Medina is preserved, after the revolutions of twelve centuries by the Indian, the African and the Turkish proselytes of the Koran. . . The Mahometans have uniformly withstood the temptation of reducing the object of their faith an devotion to a level with the senses and imagination of man. ‘I believe in One God and Mahomet the Apostle of God’ is the simple and invariable profession of Islam. The intellectual image of the Deity has never been degraded by any visible idol; the honours of the prophet have never transgressed the measure of human virtue, and his living precepts have restrained the gratitude of his disciples within the bounds of reason and religion.”

Edward Gibbon and Simon Ocklay, HISTORY OF THE SARACEN EMPIRE, London, 1870, p. 54.



“Muhammad, the inspired man who founded Islam, was born about A.D. 570 into an Arabian tribe that worshipped idols. Orphaned at birth, he was always particularly solicitous of the poor and needy, the widow and the orphan, the slave and the downtrodden. At twenty, he was already a successful businessman, and soon became director of camel caravans for a wealthy widow. When he reached twenty-five, his employer, recognizing his merit, proposed marriage. Even though she was fifteen years older, he married her, and as long as she lived, remained a devoted husband.

“Like almost every major prophet before him, Muhammad fought shy of serving as the transmitter of God’s word, sensing his own inadequacy. But the angel commanded “Read.” So far as we know, Muhammad was unable to read or write, but he began to dictate those inspired words which would soon revolutionize a large segment of the earth: “There is one God.”

“In all things Muhammad was profoundly practical. When his beloved son Ibrahim died, an eclipse occurred, and rumours of God’s personal condolence quickly arose. Whereupon Muhammad is said to have announced, “An eclipse is a phenomenon of nature. It is foolish to attribute such things to the death or birth of a human being.” “At Muhammad’s own death an attempt was made to deify him, but the man who was to become his administrative successor killed the hysteria with one of the noblest speeches in religious history: “If there are any among you who worshipped Muhammad, he is dead. But if it is God you worshipped, He lives forever.”

James A. Michener, “ISLAM: THE MISUNDERSTOOD RELIGION,” in READER’S DIGEST (American edition), May 1955, pp. 68-70.

Lesson: Tak kenal maka tak cinta. Kalau ajaran Nabi seagung ini tidak mahu diterima, siapa dan apa lagi yang mahu di jadikan guru ? Akal yang terhad itu atau nafsu membinasakan?

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