Chechnya: A Small Victorious War


Alhamdulillah. Being bed-ridden for the whole day did not really meant nothing, at least I managed to finish ‘Chechnya: A Small Victorious War’ after having enough sleep and rest to revive my lost energy. With headache, a running nose and possible slight fever, I missed two classes this week plus some sessions on design project. Never mind, I believe I can catch up with whatever I missed.

What drew me to borrow this book from the Central Library is the interest of one of my friends on the fighters in Chechen war. Honestly, I’ve heard a lot about this war, but never really get a clear picture on what has really happened. My curiosity heightened as I browse through my friend’s Friendster page, seeing many pictures of Chechen fighters uploaded. What’s up with these men?

Then, having finished this book and did a little follow-up research I came to understand.

I did learn a great deal from this book.

First, begin with the end in mind. Then you will have the strength to face whatever that is coming your way. I refer to this paragraph:

‘The Russian soldiers in Chechnya were ‘tired, exhausted and indifferent to everything. Men who do not know why they are there, who do not understand what constitutional duty means. Nobody explained this to them either before they were sent there, or after they got there.’ The Chechen, on the other hand, were ‘absolutely confident that they are fighting for their freedom, people who have lost relatives, in short people who have very good reason to fight seriously.’ ‘

Second, the modern war, as said by George Galloway, MP during the talk I attended earlier, is not about which side you are in, but who you are. Say, though I am a Muslim and I personally detest any killings of civilians and terrorism, it will not make me exempted from having the possibility of being associated to terrorism. You see what I mean?

It is proven in this book. Even Russians residing in Chechnya were killed by the Russian soldiers.

‘It’s our own troops who are killing here,’ shouted Tanya Yemelina, a blonde forty-year-old Russian woman…

Unlike the Chechens, who could rely on their extended family networks and find shelter with relatives in the village or elsewhere outside Chechnya, many of the Russians literally had nowhere to go.

I really want to write some more about this book, but for the time being this is It is saddening to know that though the war ended with Aslan Maskhadov being the President and the status of Chechnya, either being totally independent or not will be decided until 2001, until now no country in this world recognize Chechnya as an independent republic. No Muslim country ever given the recognition needed except for Afghanistan (under Taliban), let alone any support to rebuild the country.

It gives me heartache to swallow the reality that we Muslims actually fear losing the economic returns by trading with the Russian Federation rather than backing our own brothers.

Shame on us that we fear we will die if we do not support the States.

Shame on us.

For further reading:
http://www.islamonline.net/English/Views/2002/10/article11.shtml

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3 comments

  1. Yup, shame on us, but if we support the Chechen, then shame on us twice (we will get the same consequence) The problem with the muslim world is, we hv the resources but we don’t hv the knowledge (knowledge is power). Mayb one step at a time.

  2. Yea, u r right, helping the Chechen is a fellow muslim responsibility (even if its not through the country, as an individual somethin can be done, like what u did, litterate ppl like my, cause i actually didnt really know about ths bfor)
    But my point is, fighting through millitary will never be successfull (look at the chechen, they are free, but in misery),
    I think whats more important to win in this age is by hvg the mind power, then the technology and finally the power

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